Mesopotamian Marshes, The rebirth of Iraqi Venice

Updated May 6, 2018 / João Leitão / Filed in:
Mesopotamian Marshes, The rebirth of Iraqi Venice

Mesopotamian Marshes, The rebirth of Iraqi Venice

Mesopotamian Marshes

The Mesopotamian Marshes are a wetland region located in southern Iraq, a natural monument that also includes part of Southwest Iran.

Mesopotamian Marshes

Mesopotamian Marshes

These are considered to be Western Eurasia’s largest wetlands ecosystems. This unusual place in the desert had plenty of water, so it used to be very productive and prosperous.

Birds in the marshes of Mesopotamia

Birds in the marshes of Mesopotamia

Throughout history, it has always been well respected, because, among the arid climate of southern Iraq, the Mesopotamian Marshes allowed human beings and livestock to have a high quality of life.

Father and son from the Marsh Arab tribes of Iraq

Father and son from the Marsh Arab tribes of Iraq

In 1950 during a massive oil exploration project, the drainage of the wetlands started. This process was taken to an extreme during the mandate of Saddam Hussein. This lead to the expulsion of local tribes, creating political and social tension in the southern parts of the country.

Islet in the marshes of Mesopotamia

Islet in the marshes of Mesopotamia

Currently, the Mesopotamian Marshes slightly recovered. Unfortunately, the last decade severe drought and the previously built infrastructure have left irreversible results in this territory.

Boats of Iraqs marshes

Boats of Iraq’s marshes

The people who live in Iraq’s southern marshes are known as Ma’dān – or simple as – Arabs of the Marshlands. These people build incredible floating houses made of reeds harvested in their own marshes, transported in canoes and small boats.

Traditional house of Iraqs Mesopotamian Marshes

Traditional house of Iraq’s Mesopotamian Marshes

The reed houses are called “mudhif” and are built without any type of nails or wood. These rustic looking huts have the same style of construction of those in Lake Titicaca in Peru.

Inside a reed house in southern Iraq

Inside a reed house in southern Iraq

The wetlands harvested reeds

The wetlands harvested reeds

Due to political problems of these tribes with Saddam Hussein and consequently almost complete draining of the marshes, this architectural style almost disappeared. There are some poor looking houses while other larger ones are more ornamented. Usually, each family has a main house and a separate lounge for receiving guests.

Reed made house of the Mesopotamian Marshes

Reed made house of the Mesopotamian Marshes

Saddam Hussein ordered to drain the marshes in 1991 as a punishment for those tribes who had supported the US incursion of Iraq. Consequently, there was a mass exodus of these people to other regions of the country.

Mesopotamian Arabe

Mesopotamian Arabe

Despite all these problems, about 2000 inhabitants of the marshes still live in traditional houses. The number of residents was approximately a million and a half back in the 1950’s.

Iraqi boy with a shotgun

Iraqi boy with a shotgun

After the overthrown of Saddam, local tribesmen recovery efforts finally began to show results, and the marshes water levels went up considerably. It was the rebirth of the great Mesopotamian Marshes.

Iraqi Marshes area

Iraqi Marshes area

The wildlife and the natural ecosystem of the marshes will take some more decades to recover, while its people still didn’t give up their territory and their old way of life.

Man serving coffee inside his home

Man serving coffee inside his home

I had the unique opportunity of traveling to this part of Iraq. I was invited to visit several houses in the middle of the swamps. I was given food, tea, and coffee by friendly marsh Arabs who felt honored to receive me.

Iraqi tea

Iraqi tea

NOTE: I’ve been to Iraq twice. The first time back in 2010 and the second time just recently in the beginning of 2016. I know I’m writing about a country where its Northern regions are currently fighting against terrorists, but southern Iraq does seem a bit safer. If you think you’d like to make such a trip, contact Mr. Adam Jebrin and he will give you some details about how you can travel to Iraq.

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