Penguin Stories of Antarctica – Surviving Petermann Island

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Updated August 1, 2016 / João Leitão / 16 Comments / Filed in: / Reading time 6 minutes


Penguin Stories of Antarctica - Surviving Petermann Island

Penguin Stories of Antarctica – Surviving Petermann Island

Penguin Stories

Let’s face it,

everyone likes penguins and everyone likes Antarctica.

Definitely, one of my trip to Antarctica highlights was the opportunity of being in so close contact with thousands and thousands of penguins.

Of course I’ve seen penguins in other places in the world (Ecuador, Peru, Chile and Argentina),

but,

penguins, ice, and the incredible inhospitable scenery of Antarctica are somehow the perfect combination.

Penguins in Antarctica

Penguins in Antarctica

Penguins are the genuine land inhabitants of the Antarctic continent, I mean, they control the whole thing (expect for the nasty and scary leopard seals and orcas of course). Some penguins will welcome you, some will try to bite your pants and boots, but the majority will just be curious.

ATTENTION: this page contains highly friendly penguins. Proceed at your own risk.

On this page I will try to tour you around the places where I’ve seen penguins. But first let’s read a story about penguin survival in Petermann Island.

📕 Petermann Island Life & Death Story:

Argentine Antarctica 1955 refuge hut in Petermann Island

Argentine Antarctica 1955 refuge hut in Petermann Island

Petermann Island is a few 2 km / 1.25 miles long Antarctica island, located off the coast of Kiev Peninsula in Graham Land.

Life here runs smoothly, peacefully.

Apart from the daily tasks of swimming to get food, going up and down the hill, and pooping,

penguins do spend most part of their day preening.

Gentoo penguin preening in Petermann Island

Gentoo penguin preening in Petermann Island – NO! I’m not scratching myself…

NOTE: Preening is something penguins do to groom their feathers, spreading their natural skin oils from a tail gland. This activity makes their feathers waterproof and is the most important thing for penguin survival. Why? Well, penguin plumes are exposed to extreme weather by the Antarctica icy waters and cold winds. If they don’t have waterproof feathers, while fishing for food, their body will get cold and they will die with hypothermia – which happens many times.

NOTE: Also read the interesting article about Adelie Penguin Adaptations: Preening by Penguin Science, understanding penguin response to climate and ecosystem change.

as I was saying, penguins do spend most part of their day preening,

but also,

every time in Petermann Island is time for a nap.

Gentoo penguin sleeping in Petermann Island

Gentoo penguin sleeping in Petermann Island

Although it sounds very nice for us, in Petermann Island there is a daily effort for survival.

During the baby season, all the animals on this island need to get food to feed their chicks.

Meet the bad ass Mr. South Polar Skua

:

South Polar Skua in Petermann Island

South Polar Skua in Petermann Island

He is always hunting for food, and he loves little, cute, fluffy baby penguins.

Meet the fluffy baby penguin:

Baby Gentoo Penguin in Petermann Island Antarctica

Baby Gentoo Penguin in Petermann Island Antarctica

The South Polar Skua first mingles among the Gentoo penguins. Like if nothing is going on. A normal day in the neighborhood.

Skua Hunting Penguins, Petermann Island Antarctica

Skua Hunting Penguins, Petermann Island Antarctica

He searches for the perfect opportunity, until a defenseless penguin is either alone or hurt.

Skua Hunting Penguins, Petermann Island Antarctica

Skua Hunting Penguins, Petermann Island Antarctica

And after he eats the dead carcass, while other skuas will join him for the feast. They have to eat carefully since other penguins will try to attack them thinking the little baby penguin might still be alive. Too late…

Skua Killing Penguin, Petermann Island Antarctica

Skua Killing Penguin, Petermann Island Antarctica

📹 Skua and Gentoo Penguin fight for survival:

🐧 Penguins of Antarctica

Two Gentoo Penguins in Antarctica

Two Gentoo Penguins in Antarctica

Back to our penguins in Antarctica ok?

so,

I got the chance to glimpse penguins for the first time during a Zodiac inflatable boat trip around Horseshoe Island – below the 66° south. I first thought they were little people with black suits, but I was wrong, they were just a dozen of tiny Gentoo penguins.

Something I thought out to be unique and marvelous, started to be a day-to-day scenery where almost all islands and all regions of the Antarctica were populated by these cute little creatures.

Chinstrap Penguin in Half Moon Island,  South Shetland Islands of Antarctica

I BELIEVE I CAN FLY! … Chinstrap Penguin in Half Moon Island, South Shetland Islands

I got to see Gentoo penguins, Adelie penguins and Chinstrap penguins.

✅ Gentoo Penguin

Gentoo Penguins in Antarctica

Gentoo Penguins in Antarctica

Gentoo penguins are common along all the Antarctica peninsula. Only Petermann Island itself has a breeding colony of around 3000 pairs of Gentoo penguins – that makes a total of 6000 penguins (without counting their chicks).

Close-up of the head of a Gentoo Penguin

Close-up of the head of a Gentoo Penguin

The Gentoo penguin is the third largest species of penguin reaching a height of 51 to 90 cm / 20 to 35 inches. Gentoos are long-tailed, with bright orange bill and a white stripe across the top of the head.

📹 Gentoo Penguins arriving to Cuverville Island beach:

✅ Adelie Penguin

Adelie Penguins in Antarctica

Adelie Penguins in Antarctica

Adelie penguins are very beautiful and have a distinctive plumage. It is supposed to exist almost 8 million penguins of this type. The Adelie penguin is among the seabirds that live along the most southern parts of Antarctica – beyond the 66º.

Close-up of the head of a Adelie Penguin

Close-up of the head of a Adelie Penguin

The Adelie Penguin is mid-sized reaching a height of 46 to 75 cm / 18 to 30 inches. Adelies are long-tailed, with a white ring surrounding the eye and feathers hiding most of the bill.

NOTE: Interestingly enough to mention, the Adelie penguin is among the four animals in the Planet that commit prostitution. Adelie Penguins trade sex for stones due to the shortage of stones they need to build up their nests. Other prostitute animals are chimpanzees, crab-eating macaque and humans.

✅ Chinstrap Penguin

Chinstrap Penguins in Antarctica

Chinstrap Penguins in Antarctica

Chinstrap Penguins have a very nice and unique black band below their bill and look like they have a beard. I only saw chinstrap penguins in a relatively big colony on a cliff in Half Moon Island – South Shetland Islands.

Close-up of the head of a Chinstrap Penguin

Close-up of the head of a Chinstrap Penguin

The Chinstrap Penguin is mid-sized, reaching a height of 68 cm / 27 inches. Chinstraps are short-tailed, with the inner sides of their flippers colored in white. Their most evident characteristic is the narrow black stripe under their heads.

📹 Chinstrap Penguins in Half Moon Island:

📷 Penguin colonies in Antarctica – Images

Some photos to show you how different colonies of penguins look like.

Gentoo penguin colony in Petermann Island

Gentoo penguin colony in Petermann Island

Gentoo penguin colony in Petermann Island

Petermann Island is located in the Kiev Peninsula at 65 ° 10’S 64 ° 10’W. The island was discovered by the German expedition in 1873.

Adelie penguin colony in Petermann Island

Adelie penguin colony in Petermann Island

Adelie penguin colony in Petermann Island

In Petermann Island there are about 3000 pairs of Gentoo penguins plus their offspring.

Gentoo penguin colony in Jougla Point

Gentoo penguin colony in Jougla Point

Gentoo penguin colony in Jougla Point

Jougla Point is located in Palmer Archipelago at 64 ° 50’S 63 ° 30’W. Jougla Point has a large colony of Gentoo penguins, some Weddell seals and several whale bones.

Gentoo penguin colony in Port Lockroy

Gentoo penguin colony in Goudier Island

Gentoo penguin colony in Goudier Island aka Port Lockroy

Goudier Island is located in the Palmer Archipelago at 64 ° 50’S 63 ° 30’W. In Goudier Island there is a natural harbor called Port Lockroy. There are many Gentoo penguins spread around everywhere.

Gentoo penguin colony in Neko Harbour

Gentoo penguin colony in Neko Harbour

Gentoo penguin colony in Neko Harbour

Neko Harbour is located in the Andvord Bay on the Antarctic Peninsula at 64 ° 50’S 62 ° 33’W. There is a large colony of Gentoo penguins in Neko Harbour.

Gentoo penguin colony in Paradise Harbour

Gentoo penguin colony in Paradise Harbour

Gentoo penguin colony in Paradise Harbour

Paradise Harbour – Almirante Brown Antarctic Base is located in the Antarctic Peninsula at 64 ° 51’S, 62 ° 54’W. There is a large colony of Gentoo penguins in Paradise Harbour.

Gentoo penguin colony in Danco Island

Gentoo penguin colony in Danco Island

Gentoo penguin colony in Danco Island

Danco Island is located in the Errera Channel at 64 ° 44’S 62 ° 37’W. There is a large colony of Gentoo penguins in Danco Island.

Gentoo penguin colony in Cuverville Island

Gentoo penguin colony in Cuverville Island

Gentoo penguin colony in Cuverville Island

Cuverville Island is located in the Errera Peninsula at 64 ° 41’S 62 ° 38’W. This island is famous for having the largest colony of Gentoo penguins in the Antarctic Peninsula region. There are about 13000 penguins plus their offspring.

Chinstrap penguin colony in Half Moon Island

Chinstrap penguin colony in Half Moon Island

Chinstrap penguin colony in Half Moon Island

Half Moon Island is located in the South Shetland Islands at 62 ° 35’S 59 ° 55’W. There are two large colonies of Chinstrap and Adelie penguins in Danco Island.

NOTE:

Also read the blog post about Penguins of Antarctica – Photo Gallery, by Green Global Travel, Savind the World, One Story at the Time.

NOTE: I traveled along the Antarctic Peninsula and South Shetland Islands during 15 days. Departing from the Argentine city of Ushuaia I crossed the thrilling Drake Passage, down to 68°11 S 67°00 W in Stonington Island, beyond the Antarctic Circle.

Visual artist shares inspiring photos and exotic travel destinations. Adventure travel blogger with ideas and narratives to motivate independent travelers and audacious backpackers. Intense journeys into more than 126 countries around Africa, Antarctica, Asia, Europe, North America, South America and Oceania since 1999. Expat in Morocco - North Africa since 2007, polyglot and proud Lonely Planet Pathfinders blogger.

Leave your comment:

16 Comments. Leave new

Penguins are so much better than people! And Antarctica seems really beautiful. I’ve never even imagined it would be possible for me to visit, but now I’m officially inspired!

Reply

Beautiful article about Antarctica & Penguin. All the pictures are very nice.

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Thank you Hiteshi I appreciate your comment. I’m glad you liked this article about such a great place!

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Penguins are the best. My kids would lose their minds with so many around! Can’t wait to show them this post. Such a treat to be around wild animals that aren’t terrified of humans.

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I’m so jealous! I love penguins and would definitely put Antarctica at the top of my dream list. Stunning photos here, what a landscape! Great distinctions between the breeds of penguins and where the colonies are. Thanks for some great inspiration

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I kind of hate you right now 🙂 I would love to go to Antarctica. I saw penguins in Islas Ballestas (Peru) and Punta Tombo (Argentina) and it was an amazing experience. They were ALL OVER THE PLACE, and so loud!

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Wow what an observation you were able to capture with the life and death situation of catching young chicks when the adult penguins are taken off guard, tragic and that is the harsh reality of life in Antarctica and survival.

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I loved the article! What a fun penguin fest – I am inspired enough to consider actually going somewhere freezing cold to get a similar experience.

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MY ultimate bucket list. I can’t wait to go there.

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Ah, you have just done one my top bucket list destinations! Amazing! And your narrative of these adorable penguins make me crave even more for this adventure. Please stop making me jealous… haha!

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Fantastic photos and a wonderful opportunity to be so close to penguins in their natural habitat, I wouldn’t mind at all if they wanted to bite my pants and boots if I got to be that close to them.

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What beautiful pictures. I think you’re right – we all love penguins. And after reading this I think I love them a little bit more!!

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What a fabulous trip! I love the stories about the different penguin breeds

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Love this! Penguins are just the best and we are dying to visit Antarctica. Great photos and sounds like some amazing adventures!

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Barbara Dinora
May 16, 2015 8:16 am

This is very good collection of pictures of penguin. It is very interesting post. Thank you very much. I want to travel Paradise Harbour.

Reply
Maria Sanchez
May 11, 2015 5:45 am

This is very good collection of pictures of penguin. It is very interesting post. Thank you very much. I want to travel Paradise Harbour.

Reply

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